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Paradoxes of green : landscapes of a city-state / Gareth Doherty.

By: Doherty, Gareth.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Oakland, California : University of California Press, [2017]Description: xii, 198 p., 24 unnumbered p. of plates : ill., maps ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780520285019.Subject(s): Urban landscape architecture -- Bahrain | Green -- Social aspects -- Bahrain | Colors -- Social aspects -- Bahrain | Greenbelts -- Bahrain
Contents:
Introduction : two seas, many greens -- Green scenery -- The blueness of green -- How green can become red -- The memory of date palm green -- The clash of the Manama green belt -- The promise of beige -- Brightening green -- The whiteness of green.
Summary: "This highly innovative book is a multidisciplinary study of green and its significance from multiple perspectives : aesthetic, architectural, environmental, political, and social. It is centered on the Kingdom of Bahrain, the smallest and greenest of the Arab states in the Persian Gulf, where green has a long and deep history appearing cooling, productive, and prosperous--and a radical contrast to the hot, hostile desert. As is the case with cities around the world, green is often celebrated as a counter to gray urban environments, yet green has not always been good for cities. To have the color green manifested in arid environments is often in direct conflict with 'green' from an environmental point of view; this paradox is at the heart of the book. Given the resources required to maintain green in arid areas, including cities, the provision of green often bears significant environmental costs. In arid environments such as Bahrain, this contradiction becomes extreme and even unsustainable. Based on long-term ethnographic fieldwork, Gareth Doherty explores the landscapes of Bahrain where green represents a plethora of implicit human values and lives in dialectical tension with other culturally and environmentally significant colors and hues. The book's six chapters focus on: Blue, Red, Date-palm Green, Grass Green, Beige, and White. Implicit in his book is the argument that concepts of color and object are mutually defining and thus a discussion about green becomes a discussion about the creation of space and place"-- |c Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: Gulf Studies | Urbanism | Gulf Studies | Urbanism | Down to Earth
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Jameel Library
SB472.7 .D64 2017 (Browse shelf) Available 5096

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction : two seas, many greens -- Green scenery -- The blueness of green -- How green can become red -- The memory of date palm green -- The clash of the Manama green belt -- The promise of beige -- Brightening green -- The whiteness of green.

"This highly innovative book is a multidisciplinary study of green and its significance from multiple perspectives : aesthetic, architectural, environmental, political, and social. It is centered on the Kingdom of Bahrain, the smallest and greenest of the Arab states in the Persian Gulf, where green has a long and deep history appearing cooling, productive, and prosperous--and a radical contrast to the hot, hostile desert. As is the case with cities around the world, green is often celebrated as a counter to gray urban environments, yet green has not always been good for cities. To have the color green manifested in arid environments is often in direct conflict with 'green' from an environmental point of view; this paradox is at the heart of the book. Given the resources required to maintain green in arid areas, including cities, the provision of green often bears significant environmental costs. In arid environments such as Bahrain, this contradiction becomes extreme and even unsustainable. Based on long-term ethnographic fieldwork, Gareth Doherty explores the landscapes of Bahrain where green represents a plethora of implicit human values and lives in dialectical tension with other culturally and environmentally significant colors and hues. The book's six chapters focus on: Blue, Red, Date-palm Green, Grass Green, Beige, and White. Implicit in his book is the argument that concepts of color and object are mutually defining and thus a discussion about green becomes a discussion about the creation of space and place"-- |c Provided by publisher.

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